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's what is scary. the backdrop of the presidential year was europe. we know where this path leads. all this turmoil, the huge welfare and the low productivity and high unemployment that comes along with them, that was the backdrop of the presidential campaign. voters voted, and they said, yes, we are going to keep moving in that direction, kim. where do you think the electorat is here? is it be ibd hue the choices that -- is it behind the choices that jason suggested they might be? >> barack obamaus won this election by very effectively making this a referendum about his opponent, mitt romney. if you went out and asked most americans, do you think barack obama did a great job in his first term? do you want significantly higher taxes? do you want the government to do nothing about spending? are you happy with obama care? most would say no. but in the end the choice was between a president who said things aren't great, but i'm going to still try to make them better, and a guy who he painted as not having a plan and not identifying with the average wants and needs of most middle class ame
. ultimately this means that europe and the united states have less leverage in the region. this allows other countries in the region to compete or political, economic and military influence in the region. i'm looking for to hearing eyewitnesses discuss this issue today. really want to hear what you have to say. i believe that armenia, azerbaijan and georgia, trustworthy allies of the united states better realize full well that their bilateral relationships are complicated and that they have to take their immediate neighborhood into account also. with only two open borders and one of them being with iran, armenia faces the constant threat of isolation. this is a for driver in managing armenia's relationship with iran. azerbaijan has a sizable diaspora in northern iran, by vastly different strategic social and political orientation than iran's leaders. despite a potential religious incident between iran and trenton, iran has a stroke decided with armenia over the contested region. furthermore, azerbaijan and joys the solid relationship with israel. which further distances terrain from one anot
in europe compared to america? is that just an example of you were disciplined in europe and you got a lot of business? i'm trying to understand. europe is harder right now than america. >> exactly. that underscores the point that what we do nobody else can do. we want to make the offer when your wallet is out of your pocket not six months after you leave the store. you can go look in the filing cabinet that oracle or s.a.p. or microsoft has and that's the 20th century. we're all about doing things in realtime. we make you that offer when your wallet is out and your credit card is in your hand. nobody else can do that. that's a universal big data realtime problem that only tibco can solve. >> you mentioned oracle and s.a.p. and analysts that i checked in with say that ibm has come on very strong. >> ibm is our strongest competitor. we beat them every single time in terms of technical performance. they do have strong relationships and at the end of the day we have to be three years ahead of the competition and we believe we are. >> okay. you had 25 deals that were over 1 million. last year
of the things that has happened since 1989 is the region called eastern europe has become very differentiated. these countries will longer have anything in common with each other except for the common memory of communist occupation. >> more with anne applebaum, tonight at 8:00 on a "q&a." >> "washington journal" continues. host: for the latest in the so- called fiscal cliff negotiations, we are joined by stand from -- stanley collender, and we also have josh gordon. thanks to you as well. stan, you were on last week and we ask you for the percentages. you put the chance of a fiscal cliff getting done at. this week? -- gettguest: i think there is o chance other than new year's day, and even that might be overstating it a little bit. right now i am seeing a 75% chance that they will go over the cliff. host: joshua, what odds would you give? caller: i have no idea. i would say that it could be 50 -- guest: i have no idea. i would say. the thing that americans and the public should worry about is whether they get something done soon. there is a chance that by inauguration day, something will be d
collapsed, places like russia, eastern europe. and for the rest of the world growth has basically meant increases in carbon. so the idea that comes from mainstream economics that you can decouple carbon from the size of the economy is not at all born out over the last 20 years. >> it's born out of germany. if someone can do it, it can be done, right? is that the answer? >> well, they've had very little slow gdp growth. and there they are an unusual economy. they've been able to export a lot of their -- big export surplus. >> everyone want to be germany. in the future, we will all be net exporters. >> can i make what is going to sound in this context like the naive case for growth and remind us why -- >> i want you to. >> why it's actually important? so, you know, let's stipulate yes, climate change is really important and, yes, juliet is absolutely right. it's really hard to do both at the same time but we have to be really careful to sort of -- it can be easy to say, let's forget about growth. all of these other things, children playing and being happy are so important. the reality is
and if we want to make progress to cut unemployment benefits and things like that the war in europe and united states began preparing. we have our military buildup it would increase 20% 27 million jobs right now. it turns out there wasn't enough spending in the economy they could and should have been spending more on the government and thanks to the method it's the same thing right now. there is overwhelming contribution that this is the time having the government spend more would be freed, putting people to work with the unemployed that would be basically doing nothing and essentially it is very easy and very hard politically because it is hard to persuade people about the need to do that which is why some of us books. [laughter] >> some of those would argue it's like a sugar pill for the transient work of time and then you fell back. i think it's a very interesting story. why did little more to, why didn't we strike back in the depression? in fact there was montgomery ward was a major kept waiting for the depression to comeback basically lost their position in the marketplace. it
-quality problem, turning around europe, taking india by storm, talking about adding thousands upon thousands of stores throughout china, even showed you numbers that said unlike yum, kentucky fried chicken, hasn't seen any deceleration in china. these are my ears like i listen, i've watched. howard schultz, call me crazy, investing with them, my bad. and then i heard the questions from the audience, i didn't even listen. what were they looking at versus what i was looking at. they were looking at john carter, i was looking at the new bond movie. one after another, they were all down beat. is the expansion too rapid? whether demand for expensive coffee is there. i was waiting for a guy to say, listen, that triple cappuccino it stinks. if i were howard, i would tell them to take a hike. they were too negative versus what the company's up to. opportunity. starbucks was actually down. one time -- i have the apple ipad, you know, thing i'm like, wow, it's under 50. i mean, wow. terrific opportunity. ipad, i mentioned it, surprised one didn't come down and hit me over the head and knock me out. ap
things worse. europe is doing it, southern europe. it keeps raising. the economy contracts even more. about to go in recession. japan raising taxes. why in the world we would apply that poison to ourselves. lori: that is the ultimatum from the white house, as you know. because of the president's reelection they have the leverage. so are the republicans going to have any choice but to cave especially on the issue of raising taxes for higher-income americans? >> well, there are small business owners. 63 percent, and people who create capitol, invest capital. we have seen in europe and france especially, that kind of thing does not work. he does not have a mandate to hurt the economy which is the way the republicans should phrase this thing. why harm the economy now. lori: edges of the economy fall off the cliff to iraq or raising the tax on the wealthy. >> with the republicans should do, making the point they're raising taxes is a bad thing to do, let's postpone this bank. better to do that than to give poison to the patient now. our economy is starting to slow again. give people pause
german blue chips, especially when you consider the fact that we are in and out of recession in europe, we have a real malaise in front of a lot of sectors such as the carmakeres and that hasn't stopped the likes of vw, the likes of porsche, the likes of bmw having a very strong 2012. that's despite the fact that gm's opel said it will cut capacity by 20% in 2013. so we are seeing at the moment a real complacency regarding the fiscal cliff, but it's low volumes here as we enter the last hour or so of trading. back to you. >> we also have some news to bring you, broken last night. i expect john harwood talked about it on the special that we did last night. secretary of state hillary clinton is in a new york hospital this morning being treated from a blood clt clot resulting from a concussion you suffered earlier this month. she had been expected to return to work this week. >>> coming up, deal or no deal? we're going to look beyond the fiscal cliff and what it will mean for the markets. we have jim o'neill. he's going to join us to talk about whether he is bullish for the start of 2013
all over europe. >> yeah, right. >> if she's looking for her next destination, where should she go in europe? >> by train. that's what you do. >> you can sleep on it it's your hotel room for the night. >> it is but by december 31st book this deal. you get a global pass on eurail and it gives you access to 23 separate countries. you can sleep through all of them. >> you don't have to sleep through the country, but on your way to the country. >> exactly. >> skip a night paying for the hotel. two hotel deals. >> first, hilton worldwide, 40% off on weekend stays, that's across all their brands, and the best deal of all is right here in new york you've heard of restaurant week we call the dead week. they are not calling it hotel week from january 4th to the 20th. 26 different hotels here in new york offering deals as low as $100 a night versus $500 and up from that period of time from january 4th to the 20th you cannot beat that. >> i want to travel. >> i love traveling, although thinking about the train, i was once on an overnight train in europe, it literally shu
'll close with this. we have a -- a different form of government than they have in europe. this is not a parliamentary system. if you're in a parliamentary system, one government rules everything. it's one party rules everythingmeneverything.you hav. you have the speaker -- the equivalent of the speaker -- and the leader all in one party. and then you don't compromise, you put that out there and you get your program through. if there's a lack of confidence, the people can change parties. the next party comes in and does what it wants. that is not what we do here. sometimes i wish it was the form of government we had because at least there would be some action and you would know what to expect and you wouldn't have this uncertainty. because each party has its dreams, its hopes, its plans. and they would have the chance to get those policies through. we don't have that here.we have to meet each other halfway. because the house is run by the republicans and it will be next time. the senate is run by the democrats but it is not a supermajority. we have to deal with our colleag
migrated to brazil from northern europe to alleviate his seasonal depression. >> seasonal effective disorder does spell out sad. >> this was one sad little snowball when he migrated down to pra zil he forget to think about one thing, right now it's coming up on summertime. what does flaky have to do. >> might need to sit in a bowl of ice cubes. >> that would work. he wouldn't be able to move around and explore brazil. what flaky does is flaky finds shadows. >> basically pulls the vampire routine. flaky, if i have to say anything to you buddy, now is the season you should be around the snow and be around your snowball friends. come back from brazil. hope you had a nice vacation. come back. don't melt, flaky. >> don't melt! >> i'm about to show you two videos that geeks like me love. the first one, is pretty self-explanatory. ♪ >> know who that is? >> gandolph. >> on a unicycle, in portland, oregon. >> better be careful because his long flowy robe is getting caught in his unicycle wheel. >> who is this on a unicycle? it happens to be the unipiper well known. he has close to 6,000 li
it is in europe or in asia. and i don't know personally how you grow a real economy without being able to produce goods in a competitive way. i think that it's important to also understand that there are so many factors that go into the adequacy of an educational system. you've referred to consolidation. absolutely critical. and new york state, 650 school districts. a lot of them, each of whom has their -- has one school bus or some of whom have one school bus and a commissioner transportation. >> oklahoma as tiny as we are have 521 school districts. >> that is a very tough nut politically. because education is always local. and always wants to make sure her kid gets on the football team. and it's hard to change that. but there's enormous, enormous redundancy in expenditures there. and that has to be addressed. also, the nature of the population varies. and that has an impact on the quality of education. and the ability of schools to teach. and the same time we have to recognize that 50 years ago, we had -- there weren't very many opportunities for women. there weren't very many women running sta
of central europe. they have a map of the park benches and a fire hydrant. we did not have a map. do your best, he said. i looked up and my brother was an enlisted man in the army and he said, whatever you do as a second lieutenant, don't show indecision. just make in order and make a decision and move with it. so i grabbed my driver and radio operator in a looked out across one of president eisenhower's new interstates going alongside it and i saw phillips 66 gas station. there is the rest of the story. i grabbed him and went over and walked in full battle gear, gas mask, pistol and everything else up into this midnight on the midnight shift filling station operator. can i have a map of? you know, when the shows an edge of memphis appear? he jumped off of his stool, scattered around behind the counter and gave me a map and out the door i went. that was preparation number one. we did at least have the map and the lead jeep for 640 military policeman, 140 vehicles, the driver and elite jeep and the lieutenant have a map. crossing into the base, i notice that there was a shore patrolman wor
in eastern and central europe that are struggling to not only become members of the european union, but to join the north anti-ic treaty organization because they -- atlantic treaty organization because they are still seek a chance to be free from that kind of repression. i'm reminded what took place during the 2008 olympics, summer olympics, in georgia when we saw the incursion from putin's russia into georgia over the break away regions, and we continue to see lots of threats. it is a very dangerous world. very dangerous world. tragically, plato said only the dead have seen the end of war. and i remember this, we saw the demise of the soviet union, the kremlin, berlin wall, many of us did believe, and it was famously wrote about the end of history believing that political pluralism, rule of law, and self-determination, and democratic institutions would thrive all over the world. well, it hasn't quite worked out that way in the last couple of decades. and we all know what the consequences of those threats have been for the first time ever. we had the kind of attack we did on septe
. really appreciate it. >>> it's kind of a blue christmas across much of europe. we are talking about the government's cut back on spending. instead of helping, we'll tell you how it actually spread the recession there. are everything. share "not even close." share "you owe me..." share "just right." the share everything plan. shareable data across 10 devices with unlimited talk and text. hurry in for a droid incredible 4g lte by htc for $49.99. time for citi price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you really don't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it finds one, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all you need is a magic carriage. citi price rewind. start saving at citi.com/pricerewind. >> i'm saying to all of my family in trenton, njdz, i miss you all and love you all. if you missed, it's your fall. should have watched it. bye-bye. >> thank you for your service, car
, our former colleague, literally were wounded at about the same time in europe and were in the same hospital recovering from tremendously serious wounds. senator inouye, of course, later was awarded the congressional medal of honor for that. senator pryor was telling the story that when senator inouye was finally elected to congress he wrote senator dole a note and said, "i'm here. where are you?" because both of them, when they were recovering from their war wounds, had determined that one day they wanted to serve in the united states congress. inouye got here first. a few years ago senator inouye and senator ted stevens invited a number of us to go with them to china. it was quite an experience. senator stevens -- of course, another world war ii veteran -- had flown the first cargo play plane into what was then peking in 1974. and senator inouye was well-regarded in china for that service. and so the group of norse -- there must have been -- and so the group of norse -- ther of se must have been a dozen of us -- got together with the leaders of china. we were accorded every courte
as well. talking about the banking giant hsbc, europe's largest, have to pay $2 billion to settle investigation by u.s. prosecutors who are looking into international drug money laundering. investigators say the bank ignored rules that could have stopped this laundering operation, that the money went to drug cartels and terrorists. jim bolden is joining us london. what happened? >> reporter: well, suzanne, this is interesting. all of these banks have been fined by the u.s. government over last few years but hsbc, by far, the biggest. this fine, as you say, $1.9 billion. the government says that this bank has not been complying with u.s. laws when it comes to finding out where the money is going to, where the money's come from. u.s. government says there s too much money coming from mexico for hsbc not to know between 2006 and 2009, that it must have been coming from money laundering from drug cartels. they say they have put now measures in place so it wouldn't happen again. >> why are we seeing problems with or european banks as well? huge international fine -- these fines on inte
the world. the u.s. is a heavy user of credit products. europe is a distant second. it gives you a backdrop of the credit a availability. this gives you some backdrop that the markets in the united states have come back to an extent if you look at the es.ious asset class not as many people buying cars. the market is functioning. most of the student loans are going under the government's balance sheet. different loan obligations -- this data is a little bit old. $50 billion and that market is rapidly returning. this is the slide that everybody talks about, the dramatic change in how mortgage credit is made in the united states over the past six years. securitization of volumes have $300 billion in the past six years. private credit is a huge volume. $700 billion put through the private label security system. $22 billion is overstating it. of all the slides i have, this is the most telling about where the credit is coming from. it's coming to fannie and freddie and fha. 90% of loans are effectively being guaranteed by the government. it is not just a u.s. phenomenon. europe does not use a gov
they want it. say they are still in it. euro next over in europe, they are going to potentially take public, not a part of their plans, per se, in terms of just including it. here in the u.s., they still want the straight equities business. der riff city was the key. >> people want to believe this is not going to be the latest in a chain of squelch deals, denied deals. you think this one -- >> this one does not appear to have any hair on it when it comes to antitrust. >> nationalism. >> two u.s. companies. two u.s. companies. unless you want new york versus atlanta. that could be -- >> we did that. >> atlanta, the financial capital of the world. not the same ring to it. >> oracle buys a company. yesterday, merkel buys a company. today -- >> angela merkel bought a company? >> play that out. the insurance business. gardner denver perhaps. david -- >> yeah. >> this is deal mania. >> mention arris, trading up again, double the size of the -- what is happening? >> ge this week. >> potentially, the italian enginemaker. >> the fiscal cliff, result supposed to be frozen? aren't we supposed to be pa
. and then the garter, they are saying in -- back in medicine evil europe that the single ladies used to chase the bride after to get pieces of the wedding dress and they would take pieces and tear it all to tatters because it was good love. they realized later on that that wasn't working so well show they started throwing the gulstan dart are so this they would have something else they could take. -- glowing the garter so that they would have something else they could take. -- throwing the garter so that they would have something else they could take. >> thank you, jenna for the question. if you have a question you want answered, go to myfoxdc.com and click on the weather tab. >> there you go. >> time now to head over to julie wright to see what is happening with the morning commute. >> all of that and we're not going to talk about the music of billy idol. >> we got to mention billy idol and white wedding. >> what says i love you forever like billy idol? oh, yeah. outer loop of the beltway, this is where my tractor-trailer flipped over around 2:00 a.m. this morning. it was loaded with pineapple. the ri
't see it as much in the united states and in europe. at red we're focused very much on women, because the majority of people now infected are women, six out of ten in subsaharan africa. so we're trying to do the goal of eliminating mother-child transition of hiv by 2015. and could that be the first of an aids-free generation after 30 years of this plague on the planet, and 30 million people have died, and 34 million still infected. >> what else is red doing today to get the point across, and also how folks can help out? >> well, it's world aids day, and instead of rhetoric and reports and all of those things, which is really important for a transparency to monitor the efficiency of what is going on, you can take action. so we have the number one dance record in the world right now with red. it's electronic dance music, dance red, save lives with the most popular dj in the world, tiesto. so go out and buy from itunes, the record. go to join red.com and buy a lot of red this holiday season. >> red ceo and activist deborah dugan. thank you so much. i do appreciate your time this saturday
a sense of europe, perhaps real countries, germany, finland, each with different points of view, but also all with the common view that they have to find a way to work out their differences to save the euro. i believe they will. you can see it, feel it, -- listen to the words. they will find a way to get it done. these countries are also looking to us for leadership. europe chose the danger of uncertainty. we all know that. we all know the uncertainty that exists in this country. uncertainty leaves businesses sitting on the sidelines. it drags down investment and economy into the capital. companies will postpone decisions the next quarter. maybe they will not hire, not do what they would like to do. we cannot leave people wondering what is coming down the pike every few months. confidence matters. it especially matters in our economy. once we resolve the cliff, we need long-term fiscal reduction so that businesses can climb to the future. to get families and businesses certainty, we must agree in the next few weeks on specific spending cuts and specific revenue increases that reduce the d
this morning as we've seen. some of that has to do more with europe than it does with washington. but what is your reasoning for why wall street hasn't displayed more of an impact from this fiscal cliff nonsense? >> thomas, what wall street hates most of all is uncertainty and it's counterintuitive, there's actually plenty of certainty now. what's going to be certain is taxes are going up. either we go off the cliff or the curb and then taxes rise for everybody and then maybe they get repealed for the middle class and others or we reach a deal and taxes go up for the wealthiest 2% and everybody else breathes a sigh of relief. there's some $2 trillion in cash sitting on the balance sheets of corporate america waiting to be put to work. the reason it hasn't been put to work is because of uncertainty. taxes are going to go up, the deficit is going to be reduced, some of that money is going to be released. just like ed schultz said, this is all very good news for the american economy. >> so basically the uncertainty is what's providing the certainty moving forward because people across the cou
, troops were returning home from europe and the pacific after world war ii. the joy of their return was tempered by public health concerns about what might be arriving with them. would their homecoming also reintroduce diseases that had been erased from the national scene? in the southeastern part of the united states, up until well into the 20th century, this was an area that had malaria. there was a lot of concern that as soldiers returned from areas, particularly in the pacific, which were high-incidence areas for malaria, that as they came back to military bases in the southeast, that there was a possibility that they would reintroduce malaria into the mosquito populations around those military bases, and so a little unit was established in atlanta, being that it was the largest city in the southeast, to make sure that those mosquito populations were kept under control around the military bases, so that malaria wouldn't come back in this part of the country. and the way you control it, and the way we did in this country, was you got to get rid of the mosquito vector. that takes
europe. we would do fine over the next twenty years if we get government to quit screwing up. [applause] but imagine the consult assistant consult ant report if they said general washington, we have you have one ax and 14,000 people. we think this is bad. we think you should be deeply depressed and consider quitting. a congress isn't doing well enough doesn't deserve the loyalty. why don't you go home? they wanted to be free. and they prepared to die. when they crossed dpez on christmas night on a desperate and last effort before the army seizes to exist. the slogan, or pass word is victory or death. and they meant it. it wasn't victory cry or six weeks. or victory or i'm not going watch fox news for a month. it wasn't victory or i think i'll pout. all right people really passionate about the idea that freedom was the right god had given them. they weren't going fail god by giving it up. finally we get to yorktown, the last novel in washington. it's a great gamble. the country is exhausted. washington can't win the war by direct assault. he's sitting outside of new york. the royal navy
of palestinian state. leaders in the u.s., australia, and europe say this plan could kill any chance of a two-state solution. our frederick plankin actually visited the construction zone. >> reporter: these barren hills outside jerusalem are the center of the international uproar. the area is called e1 in the west bank where israel says it's planning to construct a settlement neighborhood. the land is already developed with power lines, roads, and a functioning police station. a few miles away in the palestinian town people say the new settlement construction would be catastrophic. this taxi driver believes it would make it almost impossible for him to get to many towns in the west bank. if they build this settlement and close off our roads, it will mean that my trip from hebron to jericho will take between five hours and a whole day, he says. the construction here would essentially be an expansion of one of the largest israeli settlements in the west bank. israel announced the construction of some 3,000 homes in the west bank and east jerusalem as a punitive measure after palestinians won a
very little difficulty in distinguishing ourselves from the crisis that is in gulf and europe and especially greece. the other thing we could do is come to a midline course of action where you could actually -- what can you minimally due to cut spending? what can you minimally due to have shared sacrifice so everyone is sacrificing something in this game? the other thing we don't talk about -- the interest rates on the deficit have been the lowest in 200 years. if we went back to what it was 50 years ago, it would triple. ishave not got to thin leaderst not about being popular or well- liked. he may lose his leadership role. in the end, he would have saved this country from fiscal disaster, from bankruptcy, and a crisis that will affect all americans them that all americans. . all americans. host: what would you like to see done? is this a united opinion on the right when it comes to how it should be handled? guest: let's take the impact of the tax policies. that is a very good question. if you are a worker making $60,000 a year, head of household, and if your income bracket i
in europe is 25%. like france is not where we want to be on tax policy. the canadians are at 17%. where you have high marginal tax rates, it slows economic growth. you can see it on the corporate side and on the individual side. we will over time take the corporate rate to 25 from 35. because it will be better for growth, we will actually have more revenue for the government and not less. with government growth at 4% per year, reagan levels, versus 2% per year, france over last 20 years or obama over last four, you do that for decades, the federal cabinet raises $5 trillion in additional tax revenue. the best way to get revenue for the government at such strong, robust and jobs-creating economic growth. unfortunately, president obama and the democrats have taken the opposite direction over the last four years. that's why we are in this mess. host: now to an independent in georgia, al. if i would push the right button. sorry about that. al, good morning. caller: good morning. the last time you were on c- span, i managed to get through. it was on the heels of you going to atlanta and to chast
all of europe and the rest of the world. one of the italian leaders is stepping down and the other one planning a controversial comeback causing shock waves across europe. . fortunately we've got ink. . it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office supply stores. rewards we put right back into our business. this is the only thing we've ever wanted to do and ink helps us do it. make your mark with ink from chase. [ sniffs ] i took dayquil but my nose is still runny. [ male announcer ] truth is, dayquil doesn't treat that. really? [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus fights your worst cold symptoms, plus it relieves your runny nose. [ breathes deeply ] awesome. [ male announcer ] yes, it is. that's the cold truth! >>> the cot come back is attracting attention. sylvia bers cone any is going to run again. ben weedman the thought of the return to berlusconi is rattling some folks' nerves. >> reporter: he's back. he says he's run for the premiership for the sixty time in 20 years. a year after he resigned as prime minister he's coming back more emphatica
that has happened since 1989 is the region we used to call europe has become very differentiated. they no longer have much in common with one another. >> more with anne applebaum sunday night at 8:00 p.m. on c- span's "q&a." next, grover norquist was on this morning's "washington journal." this is 40 minutes. host: someone who's been in the news and on the news lately is on your screen now, grover norquist, president of americans for tax reform. mr. norquist, make your case for no tax increases at this point in our economic situation. guest: two years ago president obama extended all of the tax cuts that lapsed in janurary. he did so because he said the economy was weak and raising taxes ordered. the economy is not any stronger now than it was. in addition to the tax increase, he wants to impose by letting some of the bush tax cuts laps, he has already got a trillion dollars in tax increases that starting in january to pay for obamacare. when you think about fiscal cliff, the bush tax cuts have collapsed, sequestration cuts spending, and then there's a trillion dollar tax increas
. so the criticism of the ctc has received from foreign countries has been overwhelming. europe and asia and australia and other countries have formally weighed in as well. if this keeps up, some suggest our president may have to go at the beginning of the uncle around the world doing one of his famous apology to words for what is going on here in the country. the criticism of received is by no means limited to foreign regulators. there's also been a lot of criticism levied by many domestic entities including some of your counterparts at the ftc. and even some of your own commissioners. even former clinton administration chairman of the council of economic advisers, senior fellow met at the liberal leaning somewhat liberal leaning brookings institution, martin baily has suggested a swing of the pendulum has gone back and is overly harsh. i also constantly about the ctc being a world-class regular. that's what we all one. i am told is the best entity to determine the rules of the road for the swaps market, which some might have doubts. for example, does a world-class regular rush
choices here. and do we really need all these troops deployed in europe that have been there basically since world war ii? i mean, i don't think germany's going to invade france any time soon or russia's going to invade poland. but yet we have a huge amount of deployed american forces in europe. i mean, maybe we need to have a discussion about whether or not we need that. whether or not we can afford that expense. whether or not that does anything to enhance our security. again, i want a military that is the best in the world, i want it to continue to be that way, i want it to be second to none. i want to make sure we have all that we need but i don't want to be investing in things we don't need. and when the joint chiefs of staff and when the secretary of defense and all the experts tell us that they don't need something and we here appropriate money to keep something going that is unnecessary, that is unwanted, at the same time while you're trying to cut the benefits of some poor old lady, her social security, there's something wrong with this equation. we got to start thinking about
. and this was a song that was literally a global phenomenon. it came to us from korea, spread through europe, the united states, south america. i've seen videos from people all over the world doing the dance. it really created something that was at a global style. this is one of the things that is happening on youtube. we're seeing that more and more over time. >> we're talking about international. how's the fiscal cliff doing in terms of internet searches? >> not as many compelling searches about the fiscal cliff. >> happy new year. >> thank you. appreciate it. >> that's how we become famous, make a compelling fiscal cliff video. gangnam style. >> ahead on "starting point," a health scare for hillary clinton. the secretary of state is in the hospital being treated for a blood clot. the latest on her condition in a moment. >> and 16 hours and counting until the fiscal cliff free fall. can they possibly get something done? sfx- "sounds of african drum and flute" look who's back. again? it's embarrassing it's embarrassing! we can see you carl. we can totally see you. come on you're better than
. in latin america, africa, europe, and elsewhere. the past decade of war has reinforced the less than that one of the most effective ways to address long-term security challenges is to help build the capabilities of our allies. we have seen its approach with our counterinsurgency campaigns in iraq and afghanistan and our top to assert -- our counter- terrorism efforts in yemen and somalia. we are expanding our security force assistance to a wider range of partners, in order to address a broader range of security challenges. in the asia-pacific, the middle east, and europe, africa, and latin america 3 to implement this area of strategy, the services are retaining the security cooperation capabilities we have honed over a decade of war and making investments in regional expertise. for example, for the army's new regionally aligned for grade a g brigade structure, they are able to engage on a rotational basis -- regio0nally aligned brigade structure, they are able to engage on a rotational basis. to cut through the prophecy and red tape to provide the assistance -- through the burea crac
and -- off the coast of georgia and panels in canada, and in the -- battle some western europe's, but the majority of battles are fought here. the interesting, the really interesting thing to me is that most of the battles fought here, the big battles are lost, losses the really incredible achievements, logistical achievements are evacuation's. and those -- said that is proline number one reason that we don't celebrate this area in full force. >> the other x loughner side. about 8,000 americans were killed in action. >> but a 11,000 tiny and the prison ships. >> most of those are new york. 7,000 prisoners apparently perished. >> at think that to prison ships better off what is now the brooklyn navy yard, to prison ships have something like 11,000, it's an estimate. people bynum. and again, that points. they're not the people who you would necessarily build a giant memorial for singularly. but, yes, those prison ships, washington protested the malta the war. people on the ships were not being fed, barely being fed to my dying and the ships. and if you got off, if you were an off
and state authorities have reached a record-setting settlement with british banking giant hsbc. europe's largest lender has agreed to a staggering settlement. this is a big fine. hsbc is accused of helping transfer billions formations like iran doing business with firms linked to terrorism and also enabling mexican drug cartels to move money illegally through u.s. subsidiaries. >> considering that, that sounds low, $2 mibillion for helping mexican drug cartels and terrorists out of iran? >>> and asia asending, the west in decline. 300 years of the west rising is reversing. american intelligence agencies are preparing this report that they do every four years for incoming administration. the world undergoing tectonic shifts, comparable to the french revolution and industrial revolution, but happening much faster. by 203 0shgs asia will see the power it last had in the middle ages and the report says "the uni polar moment is over and pa x americana, the era of american ascendcy is fast winding down. the squabbling over trying to close just a part of our deficit and in the lock view, take
happened since 1989 is the region that we used to call eastern europe has become very differentiated. these countries no longer have much in common with one another. >> more about life in soviet east germany from the end of world war ii through 1956 from her historical narrative, sunday night at 8:00 on c-span. >> "washington journal" continues. host: we want to welcome sarah kliff, a health care reporter with "the washington post." as we continue our series, we want to take a look at different aspects of what we can expect as we face the january 1 deadline. we want to talk about the said likely the doc fix. many people say you have to understand the doc fix. guest: it is something we have had since about a decade ago. back in 1997, congress set a formula for how to pay doc fares. it worked for about five years until the cost of health care started growing. what we have seen every year is congress passed a temporary pay patch to make up the difference. every year, we get to the end of the year and there is this in. gap. right now if we do not pass it, medicare salaries will go down b
and bob dole, our former colleague, literally were wounded at about the same time in europe and were in the same hospital recovering from tremendously serious wounds. senator inouye of course was awarded the congressional medal of honor for that. senator pryor was telling a story that's when senator inouye was finally elected to congress he rode senator dole aide notes that said, i am here. where are you? because both of them when they were recovering from their war wounds had determined that one day they wanted to serve in the united states congress and inouye got here first. a few years ago, senator inouye and senator ted stevens invited a number of us to go with them to china. it was quite an experience. senator stevens, of course another world war ii veteran, had flown the first cargo plane into what was then the king in 1944 and of course senator inouye was well regarded in china for that service. so the group of senators, there must have been a dozen of us from both parties, got more time with mr. hu and mr. wu the one and two leaders of china than almost the present of the uni
probably because it's pretty clear that china is both a competitor and a partner. >> number four, europe. the european union was fractured by too much debt and the austerity plans to fix it. that saga is far from over.er t market. low price bottomed out set off a building and buying spree. they ended up buying entire neighborhoods but first-time buyers were able to get a home for the first time in years as long as they had a hefty down payment. >> number two. >> cnn predicts president obama will be elected president of the united states sniet was more about socialism and capitalism, spending and cutting, about what kind of role government should have in your life. >> number one is the fiscal cliff. lawmakers saw it coming but didn't bother to pay any attention to coming and didn't bother to pay any attention until after the election. had they dealt with it earlier, who knows how strong the u.s. economy would be right now. tyeah, its the galaxy note ii.re great. you can do two things at the same time. you can watch videos and text. or you could watch the earnings report and take notes, li
need to ban gun laws that ban people from protecting themselves. all over europe there have been mass murders -- >> you're talking complete and utter -- >> people need to be able to defend themselves to the point of the crime and not for the police to come until after everybody's dead. >> what you said, mr. pratt, the gun deaths in australia and britain, they are 35 people killed a year. your country is 12,000. >> your murder rate is lower than ours, that is true. >> it's 35 against 12,000. >> your violent crime rate -- your violent crime rate is higher than ours, as is the violent crime rate in australia. america is not the wild west that you are depicting. we only have the problem in our cities and unhappily in our schools where people like you have been able to get laws put on the books that keep people from being able to defend themselves. i honestly don't understand why you would rather have people be victims of a crime than be able to defend themselves. it's incomprehensible. >> you're an unbelievably stupid man, aren't you? >> it seems to me you're morally obtuse. you seem to b
dangerous for the future of humanity and for the future of europe itself. is that bluster or is that a serious threat? >> you know i think it could be a serious threat and it is also bluster. i think it's both. what we're seeing is iran increasingly panicking because of what is going on in syria. you see reports today there are just thousands of people pouring over the border into lebanon, into turkey as well. jenna: refugees. >> these are refugees or others just trying to get out. so one clear thing is that the iranians have one ally in the region which is syria. if syria is now imploding and assad is going to be done i think that changes the whole map. we're entering a whole new phase. i think we, the united states, we have to be prepared for that new phase of iranians panicking. jenna: let's talk a little bit about that because in the last 21 months, seems the story as we've been telling it will end if and when assad leaves or falls. but it seems like what you're saying, that is just where the story begins. >> that is just the beginning. we have iranian elections coming
a car wash at the end of the runway. they've done it in europe. it works like a charm. you're going to save time money and chemicals. and things actually work. if somebody can explain that one to me. >> how about hotels, peter? >> now i'm getting angry. this is my gift for the hotels. 100 watt, 150 watt, and 200 watt light bulbs. you know why? no hotel room should be paid for their job until they spend a night in their room. don't trap me with mood lighting. you put me with mood lighting i'm in a bad mood. people do not change their lifestyle. i like to read in my room. like to be able to see in my room. so new light bulbs. >> i'm going to try to push you over the travel cliff by talking about cruise lines. what should they be doing. >> very simple. more sea, less ports. i'm a big fan of the time you spend at sea. i think there's nothing less desirable than being in port with a straw hat trapped on a bus going to a location. >> where everybody's sent. >> you don't have to always be herded on and off the ship. >> how about travelers? what's your gift for them? >> no mo
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